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The philosophy behind the games

"Good Knight", the prototype for "Ghosts!"

"You know, I hate work. The whole idea of work is repellent to me. But that has nothing to do with being active. If you're doing something you love, you can't call that work."

"Game inventor is the title I've given myself. It's a bit ridiculous really, a bit overblown, but I like it. People smile when they hear it. You need a label in life – without one you're nobody. But you also wouldn't really call a poet an inventor of poems."

"I think everybody has a game in them. You just need to stimulate it to come out."

"Anybody could invent – I'm sure of it – if they wanted to and weren't afraid of it. We know every kid invents things. If they don't have a ready-made game around, they'll take something and make something else out of it, something they can play with. A can can become a ball. A box can be a car. But there comes a point when that creative urge lets up. They stop inventing. But I haven't stopped. Maybe that explains everything."

"When I play a game, and when I develop one, I like to be guided by pleasure and fun, like an artist or a poet. There are hardly any clear goals except that."

"We already have chess and poker. We don't need any new games. I have no idea why there are game inventors, they’re doing something completely useless. But you could also say that about composers, or poets or painters. Aren't there enough pictures in the world? But there will always be new ones. And there will always be new games for the same reason."

"One thing that I find so enchanting about games is that they’re so wonderfully useless. They have absolutely no purpose outside themselves."

"Any really good game has a certain something that you can't exactly define, because there are too many words for it – like love, happiness, enthusiasm, passion, devotion, humanity."

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